Technology Management

Technology management is set of management disciplines that allows organizations to manage their technological fundamentals to create competitive advantage. Typical concepts used in technology management are:

  • technology strategy (a logic or role of technology in organization),
  • technology forecasting (identification of possible relevant technologies for the organization, possibly through technology scouting),
  • technology roadmap (mapping technologies to business and market needs), and
  • technology project portfolio (a set of projects under development) and technology portfolio (a set of technologies in use).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The elements of information management

Several strands have contributed to the development of information management. First, it has its origins in a variety of fields that have had to do, traditionally, with the acquisition, organization, maintenance and use of documents: archives and records management, and librarianship and information science (especially in special librarianship and information work). Many of the areas of concern within IM have long been the concern of other professional groups in the information field, including database design and development, information storage and retrieval, and the economics of information.

Second, the development of information technology, and its growing application to all aspects of information management, has been a strong formative influence. The costs of computer-based systems draw direct attention to the issues of the value of information and cost-benefit relationships in the development of information systems and services. Where the costs of such systems have previously been hidden in the work done by a wide range of organizational staff members, their sudden emergence into significance consequent upon the introduction of computers has caused organizations to view information functions in a new light.

Finally, the wide application of information ideas, developed in the business schools, widely accepted in business, and given prominence in the business press and in the media generally, and applied increasingly in public-sector organizations, has resulted in the acceptance of such concepts as strategic planning, cost-benefit analysis, resource management and marketing.

T.D. Wilson PhD
Visiting Professor, Högskolan i Borås, Sweden
Professor Emeritus, University of Sheffield, UK

 

Posted By: Delicana, Flora Mae

Technology Management,Global Issues of ITM, Critical Issues of ITM, and Elements of Information Management

Technology Management

-The MS Management of Technology program (MOT) is designed for college graduates and professionals who aim to make a difference in a world in which economic and social advancement is increasingly dependent on the integration of technology and business. This program introduces participants who aspire to become technology managers and leaders in the 21st century to cutting-edge thinking and best practice in technology management and innovation. The MOT program embodies the School of Engineering’s academic philosophy of invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship (i2e). Put simply, i2e is about transforming scientific inventions into innovations that lead to significant economic and social impact.

ITM- Information Technology Management

Course Descriptions Webster University 2016-2017 Graduate Studies Catalog 1 ITM 5000 Information Technology Management: Overview (3) This overview course presents a managerial and technical perspective that considers the application and management of information and communications technology in business and other types of organizations. The course includes an overview of all the core courses in the ITM curriculum. This course is a Prerequisite for all other courses in the program. ITM 5100 Information and Communications Systems and Networks (3) This course introduces students to the technical aspects of information and communications networks and technology. The course focuses on the interdependencies among information and communications technologies and architectures. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of networks (LAN and WAN). ITM 5200 Project Management of Information Technology (3) This course introduces students to the procedures, tools, and techniques used in planning and managing major IT projects. Issues covered include definition, planning, implementation, control and evaluation of the project. The course also focuses on developing the manager’s ability to organize and lead project teams, and conflict resolution. NOTE: BUSN 6110 – Operations and Project Management is NOT an acceptable substitute for this course. ITM 5300 Procurement and Contract Management for Information Technology (3) This course covers the basic concepts and practices in procurement and contract management, not from a strict legal approach, but rather in a manner that equips a student with the skills and knowledge necessary to negotiate and manage the procurement of information and communications technology, armed with an understanding of the critical issues.

ELEMENTS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Information technology (IT) is the application of computers and telecommunications equipment to store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data. Elements of information technology is comprising upon data and information, hardware and software.

Data and Information

Data is a collection of facts, figures and statistics related to an object. Data is a valuable asset for an organization and it can be used by the managers to perform effective and successful operations of management. It provides a view of past activities related to the rise and fall of an organization. It also enables the user to make better decision for future. Data is very useful for generating reports, graphs and statistics. The manipulated and processed form of data is called information. It is more meaningful than data. It is used for making decisions. Data is used as input for processing and information is output of this processing. Data can be processed to create useful and meaningful information.

Hardware

The hardware is the parts of computer itself including the Central Processing Unit (CPU) and related microchips and micro-circuitry, keyboards, monitors, case and drives (floppy, hard, CD, DVD, optical, tape, etc…). Other extra parts called peripheral components or devices include mouse, printers, modems, scanners, digital cameras and cards (sound, color, and video) etc… Together they are often referred to as a personal computers or PCs.

Software

Software is a general term for the various kinds of programs used to operate computers and related devices. Software is a generic term for programs that are used by computers and other products that contain logic circuitry (i.e., embedded systems). In a broader sense it can also refer to all information (i.e., both programs and data) in electronic form, and it can provide a distinction from hardware, which refers to media and systems on which software can exist and be used.

Posted by: Maria Fe Delicana

Source: https://ditnotes.wordpress.com/dit/dit-first-semester/introduction-to-information-technology/elements-of-information-technology/

https://www.amazon.com/Global-Issues-Information-Technology-Management/dp/1781639256

“Information Technology Management”

          Technology management is set of management disciplines that allows organizations to manage their technological fundamentals to create competitive advantage. Typical concepts used in technology management are:

  • technology strategy (a logic or role of technology in organization),
  • technology forecasting (identification of possible relevant technologies for the organization, possibly through technology scouting),
  • technology roadmap (mapping technologies to business and market needs), and
  • technology project portfolio (a set of projects under development) and technology portfolio (a set of technologies in use).

            The role of the technology management function in an organization is to understand the value of certain technology for the organization. Continuous development of technology is valuable as long as there is a value for the customer and therefore the technology management function in an organization should be able to argue when to invest on technology development and when to withdraw.
Technology management involves the application of management skills to the discovery, development, operation, and proper use of technology. Technology managers help create value for their organization by using technology and other resources to solve problems and improve efficiency and effectiveness. In short, twenty-first century technology managers help ensure that technology creates a better future for all.

Link Sources:
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_management
* http://www.uvu.edu/tm/
*

Rusel II B. Feliscuzo 🙂

Technology Management

WHAT IS TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT?

Technology management involves the application of management skills to the discovery, development, operation, and proper use of technology. Technology managers help create value for their organization by using technology and other resources to solve problems and improve efficiency and effectiveness. In short, twenty-first century technology managers help ensure that technology creates a better future for all.

The Global Issues of Information Technology Management

With the political and social changes taking place in Eastern Europe combined with the changes in Western European markets and Japanese global marketing strategies, American corporations now can utilize information technology as the ultimate weapon in reshaping/expanding their global marketing strategies. Today, global information technology is not just a set of tools for computing, but rather is viewed as a strategic tool to bring organizations growth and prosperity. The Global Issues of Information Technology Management is the right source for discovering untapped potential of your information technology. It is a global tool for the growth and prosperity of your organization.

source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_management

-Judems G. Daub BSIT-III Comprehensive  Exam

 

TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

Technology management involves the application of management skills to the discovery, development, operation, and proper use of technology. Technology managers help create value for their organization by using technology and other resources to solve problems and improve efficiency and effectiveness. In short, twenty-first century technology managers help ensure that technology creates a better future for all.

Our flagship degree is the BS in Technology Management (TM). Students may enter this degree with almost any AAS degree in a technical area or with 45 approved technical credits without an AAS degree. We also offer the Integrated Studies emphasis for the TM BS degree. This degree allows students to blend TM courses with another selected area. Finally, we offer the AAS Degree in Technology. This degree is designed for individuals who have obtained licenses, certifications, apprenticeships, etc. and desire to continue their college education. We also offer a minor in TM for interested students.

The Global Issues of Information Technology Management

 With the political and social changes taking place in Eastern Europe combined with the changes in Western European markets and Japanese global marketing strategies, American corporations now can utilize information technology as the ultimate weapon in reshaping/expanding their global marketing strategies. Today, global information technology is not just a set of tools for computing, but rather is viewed as a strategic tool to bring organizations growth and prosperity. The Global Issues of Information Technology Management is the right source for discovering.

The purpose of this study is to investigate IS managers’ perceptions of the IS management issues in Kuwait, in particular, and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, in general. The study uses a structured interview technique as the primary data collection method. The opinions of the highest ranked executives or managers for the IS functions are solicited for a sample of Kuwaiti organizations. The participating IS executives and managers are from a variety of organizations, both public and private. The results indicate that IS managers are equally concerned with managerial and technology related issues. The overriding priorities are strongly related to the general category of information infrastructure issues. The responding organizations tended to perceive most of the issues more as opportunities rather than problems. A comparative analysis reveals some similarities and differences in the type and ranking of the key issues between Kuwait and the U.S. Moreover, substantial differences exist in this study’s key issue framework compared to that of the GCC study that was conducted a decade ago. Thus, the challenge facing these countries is not so much a lack of IT resources, but how to manage, deploy, and leverage these resources to get optimal utilization.

Information management (IM) concerns a cycle of organisational activity: the acquisition of information from one or more sources, the custodianship and the distribution of that information to those who need it, and its ultimate disposition through archiving or deletion.

This cycle of organisational involvement with information involves a variety of stakeholders: for example those who are responsible for assuring the quality, accessibility and utility of acquired information, those who are responsible for its safe storage and disposal, and those who need it for decision making. Stakeholders might have rights to originate, change, distribute or delete information according to organisational information management policies.

Information management embraces all the generic concepts of management, including: planning, organizing, structuring,processing, controlling, evaluation and reporting of information activities, all of which is needed in order to meet the needs of those with organisational roles or functions that depend on information.

Information management is closely related to, and overlaps with, the management of data, systems, technology, processes and – where the availability of information is critical to organisational success – strategy. This broad view of the realm of information management contrasts with the earlier, more traditional view, that the life cycle of managing information is an operational matter that requires specific procedures, organisational capabilities and standards that deal with information as a product or a service.

Posted By: Edna Mae Buniel BSIT-III

Information Technology Management (ITM)

WHAT IS TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT?

Technology management involves the application of management skills to the discovery, development, operation, and proper use of technology. Technology managers help create value for their organization by using technology and other resources to solve problems and improve efficiency and effectiveness. In short, twenty-first century technology managers help ensure that technology creates a better future for all.

Our flagship degree is the BS in Technology Management (TM). Students may enter this degree with almost any AAS degree in a technical area or with 45 approved technical credits without an AAS degree. We also offer the Integrated Studies emphasis for the TM BS degree. This degree allows students to blend TM courses with another selected area. Finally, we offer the AAS Degree in Technology. This degree is designed for individuals who have obtained licenses, certifications, apprenticeships, etc. and desire to continue their college education. We also offer a minor in TM for interested students.

The Global Issues of Information Technology Management

With the political and social changes taking place in Eastern Europe combined with the changes in Western European markets and Japanese global marketing strategies, American corporations now can utilize information technology as the ultimate weapon in reshaping/expanding their global marketing strategies.

Today, global information technology is not just a set of tools for computing, but rather is viewed as a strategic tool to bring organizations growth and prosperity in the decade of the 90s and beyond.The Global Issues of Information Technology Management is the right source for discovering the untapped potential of your information technology. It is a global tool for the growth and prosperity of your organization.

Critical Issues

Information Technology and Management explores the many different technologies inherent in the field of information technology (IT) and their impact on information systems design, functionality, operations, and management. There are many managerial roles for an IT Manager. Mintzberg classic role model includes six managerial roles: resource allocator, leader, spokesman, monitor, liaison, and entrepreneur. On top of these roles, IT manager has to have an idea about many more management issues, such as
change management, helpdesk management, network management, human management, content management, service management, investment management, process management, problem management, incident management, stress management and so on.. Today, we should add outsource management with the Cloud computing concepts. Knowing all of these management concepts with the Mintzberg roles, IT managers are able to better operate their department and serve to the business.

Management Issues in Information Technology are listed below:
1. Network Management
2. Service Management
3. Helpdesk Management
4. Application Management
5. Development Management
6. Project Management
7. Risk Management
8. Change Management
9. Human Management
10. Content Management
11. Lean Management
12. Rights Management
13. Systems Management
14. Outsourcing Management
15. Time Management
16. Security Management
17. Performance Management
18. Release Management
19. Asset Management
20. Knowledge Management
21. Data Management
22. Portfolio Management
23. Investment Management
24. Resource Management
25. Business Process Management
26. IT Financial Management
27. Strategic Management
28. Stress Management
29. Relationship Management
30. Incident Management
31. Problem Management
32. Alert Management
33. Capacity Management
34. Configuration Management
35. Patch Management
36. Role Management
37. Life cycle Management
38. Archive Management
39. Regulation Management
40. Scientific Management

ELEMENTS OF THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Digital media and the applications that use it opened the possibility for the functioning of
new organizational models, where different entities may possess common goals, common
tasks, common resources or a common IT system. Today, IT technology allow businesses to
easily share resources and knowledge. They allow for the synchronization of information
systems belonging to suppliers and manufacturers. In other words, IT enables the integration
of business processes amongst various companies, such as automating the sending and
receiving of electronic orders, something that has became quite common recently. Through
IT applications and their proper use, organizations can co-create new value for the customer.
An important issue is the study of the IT services management mechanism from an
economical point of view. The aim of this paper is to present selected elements of the IT
value management system in the enterprise.

Source: http://www.g-casa.com/conferences/budapest/papers/Sanli.pdf

http://www.idpublications.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/ELEMENTS-OF-THE-INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY-SERVICES-MANAGEMENT-SYSTEM.pdf

https://www.google.com.ph/search?

http://www.uvu.edu/tm/

Posted By: Cristina O. Libuna

Define software, Free software and 3 examples of online software

lappysoft.jpgThe Free Software Definition

“Free software” means software that respects users’ freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis. We campaign for these freedoms because everyone deserves them. With these freedoms, the users (both individually and collectively) control the program and what it does for them. When users don’t control the program, we call it a “nonfree” or “proprietary” program. The nonfree program controls the users, and the developer controls the program; this makes the program an instrument of unjust power.

Why Software Should Be Free?

The existence of software inevitably raises the question of how decisions about its use should be made. For example, suppose one individual who has a copy of a program meets another who would like a copy. It is possible for them to copy the program; who should decide whether this is done? The individuals involved? Or another party, called the “owner”?

Software developers typically consider these questions on the assumption that the criterion for the answer is to maximize developers’ profits. The political power of business has led to the government adoption of both this criterion and the answer proposed by the developers: that the program has an owner, typically a corporation associated with its development.

I would like to consider the same question using a different criterion: the prosperity and freedom of the public in general.

This answer cannot be decided by current law—the law should conform to ethics, not the other way around. Nor does current practice decide this question, although it may suggest possible answers. The only way to judge is to see who is helped and who is hurt by recognizing owners of software, why, and how much. In other words, we should perform a cost-benefit analysis on behalf of society as a whole, taking account of individual freedom as well as production of material goods.

In this essay, I will describe the effects of having owners, and show that the results are detrimental. My conclusion is that programmers have the duty to encourage others to share, redistribute, study, and improve the software we write: in other words, to write “free” software.

3 Types of software Online:

  1. Mozilla
  2. Google
  3. Phytoon

Posted By: Delicana, Maria Fe

Source: https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/shouldbefree.en.html

https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/shouldbefree.en.html

Free Software

               free.jpg

 >What is a Free Software?

       “Free software” means software that respects users’ freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price.

        With these freedoms, the users (both individually and collectively) control the program and what it does for them. When users don’t control the program, we call it a “non free” or “proprietary” program. The non free program controls the users, and the developer controls the program; this makes the program an instrument of unjust power.

A program is free software if the program’s users have the four essential freedoms:

  • The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose (freedom 0).
  • The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
  • The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbour (freedom 2).
  • The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

 

>Should all softwares be free?

 For my own opinion, it is a case-to-case basis when a software should be free.

Why? Because when making a program, it’s up to you if you make your program a free software. It also based on the use of that software to become it a free. But for my own, all softwares shouldn’t be free. 🙂 

 

>Examples of Free Softwares

Linux Operating System

LibreOffice 

Python 

C/C++

Did you that? 

170px-rms_ifi_large

Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Movement (2009)

 

source: https://www.gnu.org/software/software.html 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_software 

=> Judems G. Daub BSIT-III / IT Electives 314

 

 

Software

What is free software?

The free software definition presents the criteria for whether a particular software program qualifies as free software. From time to time we revise this definition, to clarify it or to resolve questions about subtle issues. See the History section below for a list of changes that affect the definition of free software.

“Free software” means software that respects users’ freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis.

We campaign for these freedoms because everyone deserves them. With these freedoms, the users (both individually and collectively) control the program and what it does for them. When users don’t control the program, we call it a “nonfree” or “proprietary” program. The nonfree program controls the users, and the developer controls the program; this makes the program an instrument of unjust power.

A program is free software if the program’s users have the four essential freedoms:

  • The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose (freedom 0).
  • The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
  • The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).
  • The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

Why Software Should Be Free?

The existence of software inevitably raises the question of how decisions about its use should be made. For example, suppose one individual who has a copy of a program meets another who would like a copy. It is possible for them to copy the program; who should decide whether this is done? The individuals involved? Or another party, called the “owner”?

Software developers typically consider these questions on the assumption that the criterion for the answer is to maximize developers’ profits. The political power of business has led to the government adoption of both this criterion and the answer proposed by the developers: that the program has an owner, typically a corporation associated with its development.

I would like to consider the same question using a different criterion: the prosperity and freedom of the public in general.

This answer cannot be decided by current law—the law should conform to ethics, not the other way around. Nor does current practice decide this question, although it may suggest possible answers. The only way to judge is to see who is helped and who is hurt by recognizing owners of software, why, and how much. In other words, we should perform a cost-benefit analysis on behalf of society as a whole, taking account of individual freedom as well as production of material goods.

In my opinion, this should be free so that the society now a days can study and learned through this free software and can practice the technologies and to improve our society and technologies.

Example of Free Software that can find in the internet:

3 Examples:

  1. Google Chrome is a freeware web browser developed by Google. It was first released in 2008 for Microsoft Windows, and was later ported to Linux, OS X, iOS and Android. Google Chrome is also the main component of Chrome OS, where it serves a platform for running web apps.

    Google releases the majority of Chrome’s source code as the Chromium open-source project. A notable component that is not open-source is the built-in Adobe Flash Player (that Chrome will start blocking later in 2016). Chrome used theWebKit layout engine until version 27. As of version 28, all Chrome ports except the iOS port use Blink, a fork of the WebKit engine.

    As of August 2016, StatCounter estimates that Google Chrome has a 62% worldwide usage share of web browsers as a desktop browser.It also has 50% market share across all platforms combined,because it’s also the most popular browser for smartphones. Its success has led to Google expanding the “Chrome” brand name on various other products such as Chromecast, Chromebook, Chromebit, Chromebox and Chromebase.

  2. Python(Programming Language) is a widely used high-level, general-purpose, interpreted, dynamic programming language. Its design philosophy emphasizes code readability, and its syntax allows programmers to express concepts in fewer lines of code than possible in languages such as C++ or Java. The language provides constructs intended to enable writing clear programs on both a small and large scale.

    Python supports multiple programming paradigms, including object-oriented, imperative and functional programming or procedural styles. It features a dynamic type system and automatic memory management and has a large and comprehensive standard library.

    Python interpreters are available for many operating systems, allowing Python code to run on a wide variety of systems. Using third-party tools, such as Py2exe or Pyinstaller, Python code can be packaged into stand-alone executable programs for some of the most popular operating systems, so Python-based software can be distributed to, and used on, those environments with no need to install a Python interpreter.

    CPython, the reference implementation of Python, is free and open-source software and has a community-based development model, as do nearly all of its variant implementations. CPython is managed by the non-profit Python Software Foundation.

  3. Mozilla Firefox (or simply Firefox) is a free and open-source, web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. Firefox is available for Windows, OS X and Linux operating systems, with its mobile versions available for Android, and Firefox OS; where all of these versions use the Gecko layout engine to render web pages, which implements current and anticipated web standards. An additional version, Firefox for iOS, was released in late 2015, but this version doesn’t use Gecko due to Apple’s restrictions limiting third-party web browsers to the WebKit-based layout engine built into iOS.

    Firefox was created in 2002, under the name “Phoenix” by the Mozilla community members who wanted a standalone browser rather than the Mozilla Application Suite bundle. Even during its beta phase, Firefox proved to be popular with its testers and was praised for its speed, security and add-ons compared to Microsoft’s then-dominant Internet Explorer 6. Firefox was released in November 2004, and was highly successful with 60 million downloads within nine months, which was the first time that Internet Explorer’s dominance was challenged.Firefox is considered the spiritual successor ofNetscape Navigator, as the Mozilla community was created by Netscape in 1998 before their acquisition by AOL.

    Firefox usage grew to a peak of 32% at the end of 2009, temporarily making version 3.5 the world’s most popular browser. Usage then declined in competition with Chrome: As of January 2016, Firefox has between 9% and 16% of worldwide usage as a “desktop” browser, making it the second most popular web browser. Firefox is still the most popular browser in Cuba, Eritrea and Germany, with 85.93%and 79.39% and 38.36%, of the market share, respectively. It is also the most popular desktop browser in many other African countries. According to Mozilla, as of December 2014 there were half a billion Firefox users around the world. With Internet Explorer declining, Firefox reached second place in February 2016, as a desktop browser.

 

Source: https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/freesw.en.html

https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/shouldbefree.en.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Chrome

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Python_(programming_language)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox

Posted By: Cristina O. Libuna

 

 

“Free Software…”

Image result for What is free software?

Free software is software that can be freely used, modified, and redistributed with only one restriction: any redistributed version of the software must be distributed with the original terms of free use, modification, and distribution (known as copyleft).

“Free software” means software that respects users’ freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”. We sometimes call it “libre software,” borrowing the French or Spanish word for “free” as in freedom, to show we do not mean the software is gratis.

We campaign for these freedoms because everyone deserves them. With these freedoms, the users (both individually and collectively) control the program and what it does for them. When users don’t control the program, we call it a “nonfree” or “proprietary” program. The nonfree program controls the users, and the developer controls the program; this makes the program an instrument of unjust power.

A program is free software if the program’s users have the four essential freedoms:

  • The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose (freedom 0).
  • The freedom to study how the program works, and change it so it does your computing as you wish (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
  • The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).
  • The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others (freedom 3). By doing this you can give the whole community a chance to benefit from your changes. Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

 

For me, all software must not be free. There are software that must be purchased only by a specific type of people in our society. Software that are freed must be the ones that are just used in general terms and areas or as commonly used software. If all software will be free, some of them might be used in their reverse functions.

The following are some well known Free Software:

Operating Systems General Utilities Languages Windowing Systems Desktop Environments Web Browsers Productivity Applications Office Suites Server-type software
Linux (or GNU/Linux)FreeBSD
OpenBSD
NetBSD

GNU/Hurd

GNUUtilities GNU C/C++Perl

Python

Tcl

The X Window System
XFree86
GNOMEKDE

GNUStepXFce

Mozilla (Netscape 6) ABIWordGNU Image Manipulation Program

Open OfficeKOffice

SambaApache

PhPZopeMySQLPostgreSQL

 

Source links:

*  http://searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com/definition/free-software
*  https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.en.html
*  http://www.free-soft.org/
*  http://belfoss.eeecs.qub.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/wordle.png

 

Rusel II B. Feliscuzo 🙂